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Will This Create More Questions Than It Answers?

Organizing your time around actions you have little or no experience in is very difficult.


As soon as you start the task, a couple new ones pop up. While with those, you discover additional requirements you hadn't considered, now there are a dozen new tasks, when there was originally only 1 - and only that amount of time to do it in...


Trying to solve questions, tackle problems you do not know the answer to is a worthwhile pursuit, you grow and make leaps in progress - all the while gaining confidence to delve into the unknown and the risky.


So how to you properly manage your time for them?


Your schedule is a set of tick-boxes. Things you need to do today. When you know what yo have to do you systematically tick them off - storming through, making progress.


When you do not know what to do, this list grows as you complete it - this is okay every so often but if we do not plan correctly, and there are two boxes added for every one you tick, it very quickly snowballs out of control.


Leaving you feeling inept, demoralized and worst of all, swamped.

Kind of like Micky in The Sorcerers's Apprentice



Compartmentalize the amount your list grows by.

Only take on one of the growers a day.

If there is a question mark - immediately quote AT LEAST 3x the amount of time you think.


You can identify them when they are tasks you have never done before, tasks with unknown outcomes, tasks with additional variables such as other team members, multiple opinions and multiple metrics for success.


Pretty soon you can roughly judge how many question marks there are; see them potentially ripple outwards creating more, and know how much you need to multiply your allocated time by...


You figure out the ratios.


Always ask: will this create more questions than it answers?

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